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12 Months of the year: What are the months in order?

Months are essential units of time that help us organize and measure the passage of days over the course of a year. There are 12 months in the modern Gregorian calendar, each with 28, 30, or 31 days.

Each month has its own number of days that repeat yearly. This cycle of 12 months with different lengths ensures the calendar aligns with the seasons and the Earth’s revolution around the sun.

The months provide critical structure to our timekeeping and scheduling. They allow us to break the year into organized periods for purposes like tracking dates, planning events, and measuring cycles or deadlines. The familiar routine of months is deeply integrated into how we live our daily lives.

How Many Days in a Month?

From the months of the year, April, June, September and November last 30 days. January, March, May, July, August, October and December last 31 days and February has 28 days. February lasts 28 days in common years and 29 days in leap years.

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What are the months in order?

The 12 Months of the Year
The 12 Months of the Year

The Gregorian calendar we use today has 12 months that start with January and end with December. January, February, March, April, May, and June are the first 6 months of the year and are often referred to as the first half of the year. July, August, September, October, November, and December are the last 6 months and make up the second half.

Each month has either 30 or 31 days, except for February which has 28 days in a common year and 29 days in a leap year. The lengths of the months alternate between 30 and 31 days, with the 30 day months being April, June, September, and November.

The months correspond with seasons:

  • January, February, March – Winter
  • April, May, June – Spring
  • July, August, September – Summer
  • October, November, December – Autumn/Fall

Some months have special significance or events associated with them:

  • January – Start of new year
  • February – Valentine’s day, shortest month
  • March – Spring begins in northern hemisphere
  • April – Easter often occurs in this month
  • May – Mother’s day
  • June – Father’s day, summer begins in northern hemisphere
  • July – Independence Day (USA)
  • August – Often the hottest month
  • September – Start of autumn in northern hemisphere
  • October – Halloween
  • November – Thanksgiving (USA)
  • December – Winter holidays like Christmas and New Year’s Eve

So in summary, the months proceed chronologically from January to December, corresponding to seasons, and each has its own events and celebrations. Learning them in order helps us discuss and plan things related to the calendar year.

Months Number

The table below contains the days of the month, the total number of days, the short names of the months, and the seasons of the year.

 monthshort month namedaysseason
1JanuaryJan.31winter
2FebruaryFeb.28/29
3MarchMar.31spring
4AprilApr.30
5MayMay31
6JuneJun.30summer
7JulyJul.31
8AugustAug.31
9SeptemberSep.30autumn
10OctoberOct.31
11NovemberNov.30
12DecemberDec.31winter

Why are there 12 months in the year?

To keep a year in sync with the seasons, Julius Caesar’s astronomers made the year 12 months and added a leap year. At that time the calendar (Gregorian or Gregorian calendar) had only 10 months, but a year had 12 lunar cycles.

The months of January and February have been added to the calendar. The ancient calendar, like many other world calendars, began in March, which coincided with the arrival of the Spring season. Likewise, the reason why the names of September, October, November and December are September (seventh month), October (eighth month), November (ninth month) and December (tenth month), respectively, is that these months fall into this order when the year starts in March.

In the old calendar, months were either 30 or 31 days. These numbers are thought to be random. However, without adding January and February, the remaining 57 days were not included in any month.

Why Don’t All Months Have the Same Number of Days?

The Gregorian calendar, or the Gregorian calendar used today, was adopted on October 4, 1582. According to this, The birth of Jesus was accepted as the 1st year, which means that it was determined as 1 year, 365 days and 6 hours. This is the most realistic calendar system since there is only 10.8 seconds of error per year.

The ancient Romans discovered that there are 365 days and 6 hours in a year with the help of the lunar cycle. However, they first determined a 10-month year system for themselves. In short, it stayed in the air for 60 days.

In 700 BC, Decemvirs were added before January, and Februarius of 29 days after January, in order to save 60 days somehow. The last regulation, which was created by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, brought the system that performed the month of February for 29 days every 4 years, and the other months for 30 and 31 days. The month of Sextilis was soon changed to Augustus to honor Augustus Caesar.

What are some common monthly traditions?

Monthly traditions are a great way to add structure and meaning to your life. They can range from small, daily habits to larger, more elaborate celebrations. These traditions can help to bring a sense of continuity and purpose to your days and help to strengthen the bonds within families and communities.

Common Monthly Traditions

One of the most common monthly traditions is the practice of setting new goals or resolutions at the start of the month. This is a great opportunity to reflect on your progress over the past month and to set new intentions for the future. Another popular tradition is to celebrate birthdays and anniversaries. This can be as simple as a family dinner or as elaborate as a big party. Many families also have a tradition of going out for a special meal or outing on the last day of the month.

Another common tradition is the practice of taking a monthly “self-care day.” This can be a day dedicated to relaxing, pampering yourself, or doing something you enjoy. Many people also make it a tradition to spend time with friends or family on a regular basis, whether it’s a monthly dinner or a weekly game night.

January:

  • “New Year’s resolutions planning”
  • “Winter hike or ski trip”
  • “Homemade Soup Night”
  • “Organizing and decluttering day”

February:

  • “Valentine’s Day family dinner and movie night”
  • “Family game night tournament”
  • “Monthly volunteer work at a local charity”

March:

  • “St. Patrick’s Day family party”
  • “Monthly family photo day”
  • “DIY home project day”

April:

  • “Easter egg hunt”
  • “Nature hike and picnic”
  • “Monthly baking day (try making different desserts)”

May:

  • “Mother’s Day brunch”
  • “Family talent show”
  • “Camping or picnics”

June:

  • “Father’s Day BBQ”
  • “Outdoor sports day”
  • “Book club (reading a summer-themed book)”

July:

  • “Independence Day celebration”
  • “Family fitness challenge”
  • “DIY ice cream making day”

August:

  • “Back-to-school shopping and organization day”
  • “Monthly family dinner and a show night”
  • “Budgeting and saving workshop”

September:

  • “Homemade pizza night”
  • “Monthly outing to a local festival or fair”
  • “Cooking class (try a new type of cuisine)”

October:

  • “Halloween party and costume contest”
  • “Nature hike (looking for fall foliage)”
  • “Technology-free day”

November:

  • “Thanksgiving family dinner”
  • “Indoor or outdoor scavenger hunt”
  • “Monthly volunteer work (preparing for Thanksgiving or Christmas)”

December:

  • “Christmas tree decorating day”
  • “Christmas party”
  • “New Year’s Eve family tradition planning”

Incorporating Monthly Traditions into Your Routine

Incorporating monthly traditions into your routine can be as simple as setting a reminder on your phone or calendar. You can also make it a habit to schedule your traditions on the same day each month, such as the first or last day of the month. This can help to ensure that you consistently follow through with your traditions.

Another way to incorporate monthly traditions is to make them a part of your daily routine. For example, you can start each day with a gratitude journal, where you write down three things you’re thankful for. Or you can end each day by reading a chapter from a book or meditating. By making your traditions a part of your daily routine, you’ll be more likely to stick with them.

In conclusion, monthly traditions are a great way to add meaning and structure to your life. They can range from small, daily habits to larger, more elaborate celebrations. By incorporating monthly traditions into your routine, you can strengthen the bonds within your family and community, reflect on your progress and set new intentions for the future.

15 Must-Ask Questions for your Monthly Self-Reflection

Monthly self-reflection is the practice of taking time to reflect on the past month and evaluate your progress, thoughts, behaviors, and emotions. It’s an opportunity to reflect on the things that you did well and the things that you would like to improve, and to set intentions for the upcoming month.

It can be used to evaluate your personal, professional, or academic progress, and can also be used to reflect on your relationships, goals and overall well-being. It’s a powerful tool for personal growth, self-awareness and developing a better understanding of oneself. It can also help you to identify patterns in your thoughts and behaviors, allowing you to make positive changes in your life. Monthly self-reflection can be done through journaling, meditating, or talking with a therapist or mentor.

  1. What did I accomplish this month?
  2. What did I learn this month?
  3. What did I struggle with this month and how can I improve in the future?
  4. How did I prioritize my time this month? Was it aligned with my values and goals?
  5. Was I present and engaged in my relationships with loved ones, friends and colleagues?
  6. Was I taking care of my physical, emotional and mental well-being?
  7. Did I meet the goals I set for myself this month? If not, why?
  8. What new habits or routines did I develop this month?
  9. How did I use my resources (time, money, energy, etc.) this month? Was I using them effectively?
  10. Did I step out of my comfort zone and try new things this month?
  11. Did I make progress towards my long-term goals?
  12. How can I continue to improve and grow in the next month?
  13. What are the things that I am grateful for this month?
  14. What are the things that I want to let go of this month?
  15. What are the things that I want to continue to do in the next month?

How Many Days in a Year?

The Earth completes one full revolution around the Sun in 365 days and 6 hours. Therefore, 1 year is calculated as 365 days. It is added to February every 4 years in 6 hours. For this reason, February, which has 28 days, takes 29 days every 4 years.However, the original Roman calendar, which sheds light on our day, has only 10 months and a year consists of 304 days.

Also, have you read “How many weeks in a year?“.

Which years are leap years?

In 2016, February was 29 days.

In 2017, February was 28 days.

In 2018, February was 28 days.

In 2019, February was 28 days.

In 2020, February was 29 days.

In 2021, February had 28 days.

In 2022, February will be 28 days.

In 2023, February will be 28 days.

In 2024, February will have 29 days.

In 2025, February will have 28 days.

In 2026, February will have 28 days.

In 2027, February will be 28 days.

In 2028, February will have 29 days.

The 12 Months

1-January – 31 days

2-February – 28 days in a common year and 29 days in leap years

3-March – 31 days

4-April – 30 days

5-May – 31 days

6-June – 30 days

7-July – 31 days

8-August – 31 days

9-September – 30 days

10-October – 31 days

11-November – 30 days

12-December – 31 days

The months we use today have been around for thousands of years, with roots dating back to ancient civilizations. The names of the months have changed over time, reflecting the cultures, languages and beliefs of the people who have used them. In this article, we will explore the old names of the months and the history behind them.

The Origins of the Month Names

The names of the months we use today have their origins in ancient Rome. The Roman calendar originally had ten months, with the year beginning in March. The first two months, Martius (March) and Aprilis (April), were added later by the Roman king Numa Pompilius in around 700 BC. The months were named after Roman gods and goddesses, and many of the names have been passed down to us today.

The Roman calendar was based on the lunar cycle, with each month consisting of 29 or 30 days. The Romans added an extra month, Intercalaris, to adjust for the discrepancy between the lunar calendar and the solar year. This month was inserted every two years, and its purpose was to keep the calendar in sync with the solar year.

Old Names of the Months

The old names of the months have been passed down to us through history, with many of them retaining their original meanings. Here are the old names of the months and the history behind them:

  • January: The month of January was originally called “Ianuarius” in Latin, which is where the name comes from. It was named after the Roman god Janus, who was the god of beginnings and endings. He was depicted as having two faces, one looking to the past and one looking to the future.
  • February: The month of February was called “Februarius” in Latin. It was named after the Roman festival of Februa, which was a purification ritual held in the month of February.
  • March: The month of March was called “Martius” in Latin. It was named after Mars, the Roman god of war. This month was the beginning of the Roman calendar year.
  • April: The month of April was called “Aprilis” in Latin. It was named after the Roman goddess Venus, the goddess of love and beauty.
  • May: The month of May was called “Maius” in Latin. It was named after the Roman goddess Maia, who was the goddess of growth and fertility.
  • June: The month of June was called “Junius” in Latin. It was named after the Roman goddess Juno, who was the goddess of marriage and childbirth.
  • July: The month of July was called “Julius” in Latin. It was named after Julius Caesar, the Roman general and dictator.
  • August: The month of August was called “Augustus” in Latin. It was named after Augustus Caesar, the first emperor of Rome.
  • September: The month of September was called “September” in Latin. It means the seventh month because it was the seventh month of the Roman calendar.
  • October: The month of October was called “October” in Latin. It means the eight month because it was the eighth month of the Roman calendar.
  • November: The month of November was called “November” in Latin. It means the ninth month because it was the ninth month of the Roman calendar.
  • December: The month of December was called “December” in Latin. It means the tenth month because it was the tenth month of the Roman calendar.

In conclusion, the names of the months have a rich history and cultural background. They reflect the cultures, languages, and beliefs of the ancient civilizations that have used them. Understanding the origins of the month names can give us a deeper appreciation for the calendar we use today, and the cultures and traditions that have shaped it. It is interesting to see how the months were named after Roman gods and goddesses, reflecting the ancient Romans’ belief system and worldview.

It’s also interesting to see how the Romans adjusted the calendar to align with the solar year, and how the names of the months have been passed down to us through history. Understanding the old names of the months can also give us a deeper understanding of the history and culture of ancient Rome. It’s fascinating to see how the names of the months have evolved over time, but also how many of them have retained their original meanings.

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